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Reformed Episcopal Seminary


Course Catalog


The course catalog is undergoing change to reflect the new curriculum.

Departments:

Department of Old and New Testament Theology
Department of Dogmatic, Historical & Confessional Theology
Department of Pastoral Theology

Department of Old and New Testament Theology

54 Credits

Required Courses:

NT 501 General Introduction to the New Testament. This course focuses on issues that relate to the New Testament as a whole. Students survey the background of the New Testament (Judaism, Hellenism, and the Roman Empire, with extensive use of primary sources) as the context for the advent of Christ and the beginnings of the Christian church. The New Testament is also studied as canon to determine how and why the writings were collected and preserved in the early church. Finally, students survey the history of New Testament study and criticism to modern times. (3 Credits).

NT 502 The Gospels. The four gospels are studied in English. Students investigate the origins of the gospels, noting early church traditions and modern theories. Special consideration is given to the structure of the synoptic gospels, the kingdom of God, interpreting the parables of Jesus, Johannine theology, and modern homiletical use of the gospels. (3 Credits).

NT 503 Acts and Paul. The narrative of Acts provides the historical framework for introducing each of Paul's letters in chronological order. Special attention is given to the background and contents of each letter and to Paul's role in the development and spread of early Christianity. (3 Credits).

NT 591 Greek Elements 1. The essentials of Greek vocabulary, morphology, grammar, and syntax. (3 Credits).

NT 592 Greek Elements 2. The essentials of Greek vocabulary, morphology, grammar, and syntax. (3 Credits).

NT 593 Greek Elements 3. Greek vocabulary, morphology, grammar, and syntax. (3 Credits).

NT 601 Principles of New Testament Exegesis. This course is a practical introduction to the exegesis of the Greek New Testament. Projects and classroom discussion are designed to sharpen skills relating to the following areas: historical context and background, logical and syntactical structure, semantics of New Testament vocabulary, and theological and thematic contexts. (3 Credits).

NT 602 The General Epistles and Revelation. Background, contents, and theology of each of the catholic epistles and Revelation are surveyed. Special attention is given to the historical occasion, structure, and theology of Hebrews, the social setting and teaching of James, the relationship between 2 Peter and Jude and their mutual concerns, and interpretive approaches to Revelation. (3 Credits).

OT 501 Pentateuch. The structure and authorship of the Books of the Law are treated against their historical setting. The biblical theology of the earliest epochs of redemptive history is examined in light of the relationship between the Abrahamic and the Sinaitic covenants. Particular attention is paid to the evidence of the historical reliability of even the earliest of the covenantal documents. (3 Credits).

OT 502 Old Testament Historical Books. This course concentrates on the study of Joshua through Esther. Special attention is given to the nature and purpose of the Old Testament histories. Introduction, content survey, the archaeological and geographical background, and the biblical theology of the historical books are all examined. Issues of chronology and modern critical theories are evaluated by a careful study of the Scriptures themselves, developing a thorough appreciation for the reliability and accuracy of the narrative histories. (3 Credits).

OT 503 Prophetic Books. Both Major and Minor Prophets are studied in canonical order of the English Bible. Familiarity and understanding of their messages are sought through an examination of the texts and their historical and sociological settings. Theological issues and principles of prophetic interpretation are considered. (3 Credits).

OT 506 Old Testament Biblical Theology An introduction to the study of the content and method of Old Testament revelation. The development of the covenant concept and the history of redemption is traced from the Pentateuch through the prophets. The Biblical Theology of Geerhardus Vos is used as a text for this course. (3 Credits).

OT 604 Poetic Books. The unique style and role of Hebrew poetry in the "Books of Poetry," among the Writings portion of the Hebrew canon. Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon, as well as Lamentations, are analyzed for theological, devotional and didactic significance. Prerequisite: OT 701 Hebrew Exegesis. (3 Credits).

OT 610 Hebrew Elements 1. The mastery of orthography, grammar and syntax, lays a solid foundation for the study of the Old Testament. Both inflectional forms and their semantic significance are emphasized. The study of Hebrew Elements concentrates on the grammatical and lexical skills necessary to read the Hebrew Scriptures. Exercises are taken entirely from the Old Testament. (3 Credits).

OT 612 Hebrew Elements 2. The mastery of orthography, grammar and syntax, lays a solid foundation for the study of the Old Testament. Both inflectional forms and their semantic significance are emphasized. The study of Hebrew Elements concentrates on the grammatical and lexical skills necessary to read the Hebrew Scriptures. Exercises are taken entirely from the Old Testament. (3 Credits).

OT 614 Hebrew Elements 3. The mastery of orthography, grammar and syntax, lays a solid foundation for the study of the Old Testament. Both inflectional forms and their semantic significance are emphasized. The study of Hebrew Elements concentrates on the grammatical and lexical skills necessary to read the Hebrew Scriptures. Exercises are taken entirely from the Old Testament. (3 Credits).

OT 701 Hebrew Exegesis. Hebrew Narrative: the translation and interpretation of selected narrative passages to practice the historical grammatical method. Attention is paid to vocabulary acquisition and reading skill. (3 Credits).

BT 506 Old Testament Biblical Theology. (3 Credits).

BT 601 Hermeneutics. An advanced treatment of the rules and techniques of biblical interpretation, applying acquired skills of exegesis of the Hebrew and Greek text of Scripture within the parameters of sound principles of hermeneutical practice. Founded upon the introduction to the principles and the history of hermeneutics received in the Junior year, this course sharpens the student's abilities in grappling with specific issues of which he or she is now more fully and intensely aware. (3 Credits).

Department of Old and New Testament Theology

Elective Options:

NT 511 NT Survey: Christianity & NT Theology (3 Credits).

NT 605 Romans (3 Credits).

NT 606 I Corinthians (3 Credits).

OT 500 OT Survey: Understanding the Old Testament (3 Credits).

OT 504 Archaeology (3 Credits).

OT 505 Daniel (3 Credits).

OT 620 Isaiah (3 Credits).

OT 623 Ezekiel (3 Credits).

BT 504 New Testament Biblical Theology (3 Credits).

BT 606 Old Testament Biblical Theology II (3 Credits).

BT 775 Abrahamic Religion, Sacred Scriptures & Biblical Worldview (3 Credits).

Department of Dogmatic, Historical & Confessional Theology

54 Credits

Required Courses:

DT 501 The Doctrine of God (Theology Proper). Theological prolegomena, the doctrine of revelation (general and special), arguments for the existence of God, the nature and attributes of God, the decrees of God, the providence of God, the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. (3 Credits).

DT 502 The Doctrine of Man and of Sin. The origin and antiquity of man; the image of God in man; the pre- and post-lapsarian condition of man; the covenant of works; original sin; the imputation of sin; the total depravity of man; a comparison of the Pelagian, Arminian, Calvinistic, and perfectionistic systems. (3 Credits).

DT 506 Research and Theological Methods . An introduction to research in Biblical and theological disciplines, this course introduces students both to the process of writing research papers and developing and maintaining a sound theological method for doing so. Areas covered include library research, time management, use of the internet, proper etiquette, format, and argument development. (3 Credits).

DT 508 The Last Four Things (General Eschatology). A specialized study of death, judgment, hell, and heaven. The immortality of the soul (conditional and unconditional); the situation of the soul after death; the resurrection of the body, its glory and identity; the second advent of Christ; the doctrine of eternal punishment; conditional immortality and annihilationism; soul-sleep; probationism; purgatory; the glory and rewards of Heaven. (3 Credits).

DT 601 Christology and Soteriology (Christ and Salvation). The person and work of Christ, the hypostatic union, the deity and humanity of Christ, impeccability, theories of the atonement, the Holy Spirit in applying the work of Christ, the covenants of redemption and grace, justification, effectual calling, regeneration, faith, conversion, sanctification, perseverance. (3 Credits).

DT 602 The Doctrine of the Church and Its Sacraments. The nature and calling of the church; the invisible and visible church; the holy catholic church; the sacraments of the church: covenant baptism and the Lord's Supper; trans- and consubstantiation; the communicatio idiomatum; memorialism; sacramental views of Calvin and Cranmer; pedo-communion; church discipline and polity. (3 Credits).

DT 702 Classical Apologetics. Defense of the Christian faith as practiced by advocates of Thomism, natural theology, and reason. Contrast with rationalism, irrationalism, existentialism, empiricism, and logical positivism. Time will be spent relating faith and reason to produce a balanced, rational apology for the Christian hope. Arguments of Reformed epistemology as taught by Hoitenga, Plantinga, and James Kelly Clark will be discussed. (3 Credits).

DT 750 Ethics. This course seeks to provide the ethical foundation for a godly ministry. Following a brief examination of the history of ethical systems, students are led through an examination of Christian ethics using the Ten Commandments. (3 Credits).

HT 501 Patristics. An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the history of the Church to the Council of Nicaea. Consideration of views of the Scriptures, the church, the Christian ministry, and the trinity in the early church. Attention will also be given to the various apologetics offered for the Christian faith in the ante-Nicene period. (3 Credits).

HT 612 European and American Protestant Theology. The Course includes elements of the Reformation in Europe as it was engaged with the Renaissance, Humanistic and Enlightenment philosophies. Included is the development of theological thought expressed by the Puritans in England, the Pilgrims in the Colonies, Edwardsean Theology, the Princeton Theology of the Hodges, Machen, and Warfield and the liberal reactions to Princeton up to the heresy trials of the 19th century. (3 Credits).

HT 613 Medieval and Continental Reform. Beginning with the Latin west and the end of the Roman world the course covers an expansive period of the early, high and Latin middle ages through the European Reformation (500-1600). The student is encouraged to evaluate & discuss the philosophical-theological history of the period with an emphasis on the persons of Aquinas through Luther. (3 Credits)

AN 503 Liturgics. This course offers an introduction to the nature and elements of biblical worship; worship in the history of Israel and of the church; the development of liturgy and the value of liturgical forms; and the origins, development, and public use of The Book of Common Prayer. Students pursue independent research in conjunction with class lecture presentation. (3 Credits).

AN 512 Creeds and Councils.

AN 615 Anglican Studies. Focuses on the contribution of Anglicanism and Anglicans to the theology and practice of the wider church. It consists of an overview of the history, standards, and practice of Anglicanism which have shaped the orthodox Anglican Church. The axis of this course is an in depth study of Anglican thinkers, writers, theologians who have shaped the course of Anglicanism and the wider church. Students will be encouraged to look at how their religious practice, spirituality, and thought and that of their churches has been affected by Anglicanism. (Clearly it has to at least some degree since they are attending an Anglican seminary!) Scholars to be studied include Hugh Latimer, Thomas Cranmer, William Tyndale, Nicholas Ridley, Richard Hooker, Lancelot Andrewes, John Donne, George Herbert, John Wesley, John Keble, and C.S. Lewis, among others. (3 Credits).

AN 702 (A,B,C) Liturgical Music Practicum (3x @ 1 credit)

AN 703 The Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion. This course gives the student an intensive overview of one of the primary theological platforms of the Protestant Reformation. It permits a review of the theology courses previously taken through the lens of the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion, considered historically and dogmatically. As the formal confessional document of the Church of England and the Reformed Episcopal Church, the Articles are of special importance to those preparing for ministry in the Reformed Episcopal Church; but the study of them will provide valuable theological reflection for students of all Protestant confessional churches. (3 Credits).

Department of Dogmatic, Historical & Confessional Theology

Elective Options:

DT 511 Ecclesiology (3 Credits).

DT 525 Foundations of Christian Spirituality (3 Credits).

DT 535 Philosophical Foundations for Theology (3 Credits).

DT 665 Science & Religion (3 Credits).

DT 705 Covenant Theology. The course on Covenant Theology will examine the history, exegesis and Biblical Theology, as well as the implications of a thoroughly Biblical, catholic and reformed understanding of this central Scriptural theme. The course will have three sections: the Covenant Concept in History and Holy Scripture; the Contours of the Biblical Covenant in the Old and New Testaments; and the Culture of the Covenant in Church, Marriage and the World. The course will begin with an overview of the history of how covenant has been understood in the Church Fathers, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, Post Reformation, and invaluable recent Biblical studies by Roman Catholic, Reformed and even Eastern Orthodox scholars. Then the majority of the course will analyze the Scriptural texts to arrive at Biblical understanding of covenant as a Holy Communion, culminating in the Eucharistic passages of the New Testament, in which our Lord referred to the Blessed Sacrament as, "The New Covenant in My Blood." The final section of the course will consider the application of covenant as it has been utilized in the Church and society. Among the topics considered in this course: One, Two or More Covenants; Covenant of Works, Grace or What?; Relation Between Old and New Covenant; Continuity and Discontinuity in the Covenant; Unilateral or Bilateral Covenant; Conditional or Unconditional Covenant(s); Redemptive Historical Views of the Covenant; Covenant and Recent New Testament Scholarship of Dunn, N.T. Wright et al; Contributions of Second Temple Judaism to Covenant Theology; Replacement (Supersessionist) Theology, Two Covenant Theology and Enlargement Theology of the Kingdom; Federal Theology Old and New; Sacrament as Covenant and What Kind of Covenant; Marriage as a Covenant; Holy Scripture as a Covenant Document; Classic Covenant Theology; Classic Dispensationalism; Progressive Dispensationalism and Progressive Covenantalism; Covenant and Eschatology; and so forth. (3 Credits).

DT 710 Pneumatology (3 Credits).

DT 760 Contemporary Moral Problems (3 Credits).

DT 775 World Religions (3 Credits).

HT 505 Church History Survey (3 Credits).

HT 510 Ecclesiastical Latin I (3 Credits).

HT 511 Ecclesiastical Latin II (3 Credits).

HT 512 Ecclesiastical Latin III (3 Credits).

HT 611 American Evangelicalism (3 Credits).

HT 685 Church & World Culture The relationship between the church and its faith and practice with culture is an increasingly important one. Christians must understand cultural and social realities both locally and globally as they interact with society. Religion and society is an important social dynamic, both globally as well as in American culture. Beginning with a careful study of Niebuhr's Christ & Culture, students will develop a critical understanding of the relationship of church and culture with an increasingly global and faith perspective. (3 Credits).

HT 714 British Reformations (3 Credits).

HT 724 Luther and the English Reformers (3 Credits).   This course examines the central concepts taught by Martin Luther and his colleagues, especially as expressed in Luther's writings of 1520 and the Augsburg confession of 1530. We then study how church reforms in Tudor England unfolded, looking for points of similarity and divergence in Lutheran and Anglican movements, The course combines study of primary texts with lectures, assignments, and secondary literature that add context to the historical documents.

HT 785 Globalized Christian Worldview: Fyodor Dostoevsky (3 Credits).

AN 505 Anglican Literature and the Faith: Shakespeare & Dickens (3 Credits).

AN 603 Book of Common Prayer In this course the student is acquainted with the origins and development of the traditional Book of Common Prayer of the Anglican tradition. The different services of the Book of Common Pryaer are discussed in terms of both theology and history. Topics include the daily offices, the litany, the lectioary and propers, the psalter, language, Holy Communion, the Dominical Sacraments, the Ordinal, and the Pastoral offices. Prerequisite: PT 503 Liturgics (3 Credits).

AN 604 Liturgy as Lens: God, Community & the Self (3 Credits).

AN 614 English Church English church history from the Venerable Bede and the missionary achievements of St. Patrick to the establishment of the Church of England under Henry the 8th. Included will be the Reformation efforts under Edward VI and the settlement of Elizabeth I through the Puritan revolt and the Cromwellian Parliament and the restoration of Charles II. (3 Credits).

AN 685 Biblical Theology of Global Anglicanism (3 Credits).

AN 701 The Liturgy, the Lectionary & Preaching (3 Credits).

AN 702 (D-I) Liturgical Music Practicum (Up to 6x @ 1 Credit) (6 Credits).
(P/F) * Not available to meet course requirements; w/ permission of Dean. Up to 3 credits may
be substituted for PT 502/602/702

AN 703 Liturgical Theology (3 credits).

AN 714 REC/ACNA History and Polity (3 Credits).  This course covers the history of the Reformed Episcopal Church (REC) from the beginning in 1873 to the present day, including its part as a founding partner in the Anglican Church in North America. Students look at the REC in terms of its immediate historical context, as well as the contexts of the English Reformation, the foundation of the Episcopal Church in 18th century America, and the founding of the Anglican Church in North America in 2009. The application of the constitution and canons of the Reformed Episcopal Church to the context of contemporary pastoral ministry is studied.

 

 

Department of Pastoral Theology

27 Credits

Required Courses:

PT 501 Homiletics. Introduction to the history, science, and art of preaching. Consideration of sermon preparation (choice of text, exegesis, hermeneutics, history, culture, and doctrine); sermon structure (title, introduction, body, conclusion, outline, and illustrations); sermon delivery (style, use of manuscript, voice variety, projection, and general speech skills); and persuasion as well as argument. (3 Credits).

PT 502 (A/B/C) Homiletics and Liturgics Practice. Conducted in conjunction with the daily chapel services, this practicum affords students the opportunity to gain practical experience with the guidance of a faculty mentor. (3x @ 1 Credit) (3 Credits).

PT 601 Pastoral Theology. An introduction to the calling, content, and skills involved in the cure of souls. The course seeks to address the issues that confront the pastor in his care of God's people. Subjects addressed include: a Theology of Prayer in Pastoral Life; Pastoral Visitation; The Role of Women in the Church; Homosexuality; Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage; and the Sign Gifts. (3 Credits).

PT 602 (A/B/C) Homiletics and Liturgics Practice. Conducted in conjunction with the daily chapel services, this practicum affords students the opportunity to gain practical experience with the guidance of a faculty mentor. (3x @ 1 Credit) (3 Credits).

PT 702 (A/B/C) Homiletics and Liturgics Practice. Conducted in conjunction with the daily chapel services, this practicum affords students the opportunity to gain practical experience with the guidance of a faculty mentor. (3x @ 1 Credit) (3 Credits).

PT 704 Basic Counseling Skills. This is a very basic introduction to Pastoral Counseling that will consider what Pastoral Counseling is, what is requires of the Counselor, and what it hopes to accomplish through the counseling process. The course will cover common counseling issues including the person who is uncertain about his faith, pre-marriage and marriage counseling, counseling those who are caught in sexual sins, counseling those who struggle with homosexuality, and counseling teenagers and their parents. (3 Credits).

PT 705 Pastoral Administration I This course analyzes the role of administration as a necessary function in pastoral ministry. Consideration is given to the daily functions of pastoral ministry with an eye to using the gifts and skills God has given His people to the best advantage of Christ and His Church. Subjects addressed include: office and time management; personnel resources, proper financial procedures for the church and pastor; and maintenance and church upkeep. (3 Credits). (Students may take only PT 705 for 3 credits or PT 706 for 6 credits, not both.)

Department of Pastoral Theology

Elective Options:

PT 500 Diaconal Ministry (3 Credits).

PT 510 Ministry of the Deaconess (3 Credits).

PT 601 Advanced Homiletics: Skills & Issues (3 Credits).

PT 635 Urban Ministry (3 Credits).

PT 706 Pastoral Administration II. This course analyzes the role of administration as a necessary function in pastoral ministry. Consideration is given to the daily functions of pastoral ministry with an eye to using the gifts and skills God has given His people to the best advantage of Christ and His Church. Subjects addressed include: office and time management; personnel resources, proper financial procedures for the church and pastor; and maintenance and church upkeep. (6 Credits). (PT 706 meets the requirement of PT 705 plus 3 Pastoral Theology elective credits. Students may take only PT 705 for 3 credits or PT 706 for 6 credits, not both.)

PT 707 Introduction to Evangelism and Outreach. The intent of this course is to enable students to develop and articulate a theological and historical understanding of evangelism, identify important principles in evangelism and outreach and use them to evaluate existing models, and develop a plan for mobilizing a real or hypothetical parish church for evangelism. (3 Credits).

PT 708 Christian Education and Formation. The history, scriptural foundations and practice of Christian Education/Formation will be presented. Students will learn to apply the insights of both approaches to Christian growth by distinguishing the theological perspectives, theory, models and outlook. The centrality of Holy Scripture, the Sacraments, liturgical time, and Christian life stages will be taught. (3 Credits).

PT 709 Catechesis (3 Credits).

PT 710 Missiology (3 Credits).

PT 714 Advanced Counseling Issues: Psychological Problems (3 Credits)

PT 735 Ministry & Special Needs In our society and in our churches there are many more people with special needs and disabilities than most people realize. It is easy for people on the margins of society to get lost and forgotten. This course will help students learn how to reach and minister to people with disabilities, looking at the pattern that Jesus Christ set Himself. During the course students will be guided to thinking about and planning an effective ministry to the disabled. (3 Credits).

PT 740 Ministry to Women / Women's Ministry (3 Credits).

PT 800 Leadership (Pastoral, Parish, and Mission). This course is designed to assist the student in developing an understanding and practice of church leadership that is biblically based, theologically sound and personally transformational. Principles of leadership will be developed and applied by using the Pastoral Epistles as a primary guide. (3 Credits).

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